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Open Letter Outreach Yields 18 Meetings with Bishops

Launched a year ago, FutureChurch's Open Letter to US. Bishops has resulted in over 6,000 signatures asking U.S. Bishops "to embrace your roles as shepherds" and "open dialogue about restoring our early traditions recognizing married and celibate priests and women deacons." It was published in the November 7 issue of America just before the meeting of the U.S. Bishops' Conference in 2011. Nearly 25 percent of open letter signers agreed to "join with others to engage my bishop in dialogue about this important issue."

Individuals and groups from at least sixty dioceses agreed to engage their bishops in dialogue about the priest shortage, married priests and women deacons, via meetings or by letter on or around the time their bishops went to Rome for their Ad limina visits last winter. Faithful Catholics succeeded in obtaining meetings with bishops in 18 U.S. dioceses with groups organizing and letters sent from at least 34 additional dioceses. Outcomes of the meetings and letters are still being compiled and will be published on the FutureChurch website very soon.

Help us reach 20,000 signatures to deliver in Rome in March 2013.

Our international Optional Celibacy campaign asks Church leaders to discuss permitting both a married and a celibate priesthood and women deacons in the Latin rite of the Roman Catholic Church. Over 13,000 electronic and paper postcards from around the world have been sent to the Congregation for the Clergy and to local bishops. Our website is configured in German, Spanish, French, Italian, Portuguese and English. We hope to expand our reach over the next several months since we plan to deliver the postcards and open letter signatures in March 2013. Order optional celibacy postcards and/or send an electronic postcard to Cardinal Piacenza, your local bishop, and officials at the U.S. Bishops' Conference.

Focus on FutureChurch

Summer 2012

 

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